Skip Navigation
 

College of Nursing

Welcome to the College of Nursing at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. We are the only academic health sciences center in South Carolina, and thus we are on the cutting edge of health care practice, education and discovery.  At MUSC, we have the largest accelerated BSN degree nursing program in South Carolina, and thriving enrollment in our DNP and PhD programs of study. In fact, we are a leader in online graduate education, and in this way the MUSC College of Nursing “Fuels the Nursing Pipeline.”

Continue Reading...



Recent Nursing News | April 2014

It Starts With You

VANAP

The Veterans Administration Enhancing Academic Partnerships Program (VANAP) enables stronger, mutually beneficial relationships between nursing schools and VA facilities by:

  1. Expanding faculty and professional development,
  2. Increasing nursing student enrollment, primarily in baccalaureate programs although some increases in graduate programs may also occur,
  3. Providing opportunities for educational and practice innovations, and
  4. Increasing recruitment and retention of VA nurses as a result of enhanced roles in nursing education.

http://www.va.gov/oaa/vanap/default.asp

From The Desk of Dean Stuart

College of Nursing - Dean Stuart

Thank You for Your Service

In March, Dr. Brian Conner and our VA colleagues, Mary Fraggos and Janice Skipper, attended a two day conference in St. Louis focused on the VA Nursing Academy Partnership, also known as VANAP. You may know that we have been in this partnership with the Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center for five years as a strong educational component of our BSN program.

Because of this initiative we have been able to increase our BSN enrollment and expose our students to the unique health care needs of our veterans and their families. Currently there are 18 VANAPs nationally. Twelve of them are new and six are among the early grantees. We are one of those six early grantees.

At this conference I was particularly impressed that our Charleston nurses were leaders among the programs. Specifically there were six presentations, and someone from Charleston was on the panel of four of those sessions. We made significant contributions to each topical discussion and led the group in posing recommendations for the future.

One of the most important points made in the conference was that we need to prepare all nurses in providing veteran-centric care. This is because only a fourth of our veterans and their families seek care at VA hospitals. The other three-fourths access care in their local community hospitals and clinics. Thus it is critical that in assessing all patients we teach nurses to ask, have you been in service for your country. Only then can we identify and begin to address the health concerns of these individuals who have served us in our time of national need

Gail

 
 
 
 
 
 

© 2012  Medical University of South Carolina | Disclaimer | Campus Map | Campus Map App