EXPLORING THE ATACAMA

 The Atacama Desert of Chile is a sparsely populated virtually rainless plateau, running from the Pacific Ocean to the Andes Mountains. The average width is less than 100 miles but it extends 600 miles south from the Peruvian border. The mountains nearest the ocean are the Pacific coastal range, with an average elevation of 2500 feet. The Cordillera Domeyko, a range of foothills of the Andes Mountains, lies east. The Atacama is made up of salt basins (salars) sand and lava flows. The landscape is so desolate it is sometimes described as "moon like". In fact the Atacama has been chosen as a good site to test the prototype of a future lunar rover.

 

WHAT DO THE PICTURES SHOW ?

Earth images taken from space show information about a vast array of natural and human features. A good interpreter can tell much about the climate, ecology, economy and geology of an area. Below you will see a composite of the GeoCam photographic series. Five areas are marked as examples of five of the many different types of information available. Go to the area that interests you the most or visit them all in order. Save the mystery for last and you can try your hand as a photo interpreter.

CHOOSE WHAT YOU WANT TO EXPLORE IN THE ATACAMA

CLIMATE

TRANSPORTATION

INDUSTRY

GEOLOGY

EXPLAIN A MYSTERY

 

BACK TO THE TOP OF THE ATACAMA

BACK TO GEOCAM

Back to the Can Do Story

Back to the Beginning